Nature Book List: February (Animals in Wintertime)

febbooklist

Happy February! At the beginning of each month I put together a book list related to learning about nature that will be influenced by the season and natural wonders that occur during that month. This month’s book list will feature books related to animals in wintertime. The books make great reads both in the classroom and at home. If you’re teaching a theme related to the various ways animals survive winter, I suggest you check these out.

Animals have all sorts of adaptations for surviving the snow and cold of wintertime. The following books will share facts and information and tell beautiful stories about how different animals prepare for winter – from hibernation to migration to color changes and special food stores. I hope you find the resources useful. Check them out from your local library, or click on the picture below the title to find out more information about the book and to follow a link for purchase.

Animals in Winter by Henrietta Bancroft – A classic story to learn about what several animals do in winter to survive.

Over and Under the Snow by Kate Messer – This story shares how in winter the world over the snow is quiet and white while under the snow is a secret world where many animals live to survive the winter.

Footprints in the Snow – A beautiful story that will inspire young naturalists to take a look at the different tracks animals leave in the snow.

Grandmother Winter by Phyllis Root – Grandmother Winter brings snowfall and when she does, a story about how the different woodland animals survive is told.

The Animals’ Winter Sleep by Lynda Graham Barber – This story describes how thirteen animals survive harsh winters. Through the story children will learn about special adaptations, the different food sources, and the special places the animals live.

What Do Animals Do in Winter?: How Animals Survive the Cold by Melvin Berger, Gilda Berger, and Susan Harrison – Take a look at the many ways animals survive the cold winters. Learn about hibernation, migration, and changing color.

All About Animals in Winter by Martha E. Rustad – The beautiful photos in this book help tell the story of how animals survive winter.

When It Starts to Snow by Phillis Gershator – What do you do when it starts to snow? In this book, discover the story of what each animal – from a mouse to a bear – does when it starts to snow.

Tracks in the Snow by Wong Herbert Yee – A girl follows the tracks outside her home after a snowfall.

A Warm Winter Tail by Carrie Pearson – In this book, the wild animals wonder how humans stay warm in the winter. In an interesting twist of perspective, learn through their eyes how they survive the cold.

Crinkleroot’s Guide to Animal Tracking by Jim Arnosky – Winter, with its snowfall, is a great time for animal tracking. Follow Crinkleroot on a tracking adventure to learn about animal tracking. Perfect for getting outside in winter!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Nature Book List: February (Animals in Wintertime)

  1. Hi there! I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed this blog post of yours… Not just this one but all of them because they are all equally great.

    I should mention that because of how much I loved this post of yours I had to check out your blog and I couldn’t help but follow you because your blog is both amazing and beautiful. I am so happy I came across your blog and found it because I do really love it and I truly can’t wait to read more from you, so keep it up (:

    P.s. This comment is towards all of your blog posts because they are all equally amazing and incredible, keep up the great work (:

    Like

  2. Pingback: Build a Winter Habitat | Backyard Learning

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s